school

27 results for "Girls’ Rights"

6 lessons

Children in line holding signs

The Opinion Line on gender equality

How equal are we in our class and school? Find out using a classic exercise.

The Child Jury standing together outside

One child, several rights

A creative collage exercise that highlights the reality behind the articles of the UNCRC through children’s own life experiences.

Glory sits at desk, studying, with her diploma

If I were a Child Rights Ambassador

Children and young people in some of the poorest and most violent countries in the world are being trained to be WCP Child Rights Ambassadors. How would your pupils carry out the job of being an ambassador?

Children in line holding signs

You me Equal Rights

Inspiration from stories about children’s collective struggle for gender equality.

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Colouring Rights

Use our simple colouring templates to get the student thinking about child rights, not least girls’ rights, while being creative.

3 Related content

Children in line holding signs

Step 2: You Me Equal Rights

This step is about girl’s equal rights. Be inspired by girls and boys who are fighting for equal rights for girls. Learn about the issues and how you can create change in your local communites and in your country.

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Step 3: The rights of the child in the world

Study facts and statistics about the situation for children in different countries. Experience other children’s reality through stories about children living in different places and under different circumstances.

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Step 8: Round the Globe Run for a Better World

El 26 de marzo de 2021, el final anual de la Carrera alrededor del Globo por un mundo mejor será organizado por niños de todo el mundo.

18 documents to download

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Xadreque fights for girls

“I had to start by changing my own behaviour and begin helping my sisters and respecting their rights,” says Xadreque, Mozambique.

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Married at twelve.

Rutendo from Zimbabwe was forced to marry at the age of twelve. At fifteen, she was expecting her second child.

Rosi Gollmann. Germany.

Rosi Gollmann, Germany

Rosi grew up in Nazi Germany during the Second World War. She experienced the terror, discrimination and suspension of democracy that war brings. Only 18-year-old she decided to dedicate her life to help the poor and oppressed to help themselves.

Ashok Dyalchand, India.

Ashok Dyalchand, India

To raise the status of girls and save their lives and to put an end to child marriage, Ashok Dyalchand started Girls Clubs to give girls knowledge and self­ confidence and enable them to support one another in convincing their parents not to force them into marriage, but instead allow them to finish school.

John Wood, USA.

John Wood, USA

John Wood believes that when children can read and write, they are better equipped to demand their rights and to defend themselves against abuse, trafficking and slavery.

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Malala Yousafzai

Malala Youzafzai, Pakistan

Malala Yousafzai fights for every girl’s right to education and a life of freedom, in Pakistan and all over the world.

Josefina Condori, Peru.

Josefina Condori, Peru

Many of the hundreds of thousands of domestic workers face abuse in the homes in which they work. Josefina Condori, who has worked as a maid herself, has been fighting for the rights of domestic workers since she was a teenager.

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Ett dygn på säkert boende, USA

Ginger flydde från misshandel och exploatering och fick skydd på ett säkert boende.

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Rachel Lloyd

Rachel Lloyd, USA

Rachel and GEMS (Girls Educational and Mentoring Services) in the US support 400 girls and young women every year by providing secure accommodation, help in getting an educa­tion and a job, counseling, legal support, and love.

Cecilia Flores-Oebanda, The Philippines.

Cecilia Flores Oebanda, The Philippines

Cecilia Flores-Oebanda herself was five when she started working, and she has made it her life’s work to fight for the rights of the poorest and most vulnerable children.

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Graça Machel, Moçambique

Graça Machel was honoured by the WCP 2005 and 2010 for her long and courageous struggle for children’s rights, in Mozambique and beyond.

Ashok Dyalchand, India.

Ashok Dyalchand, India

To raise the status of girls and save their lives and to put an end to child marriage, Ashok Dyalchand started Girls Clubs to give girls knowledge and self­ confidence and enable them to support one another in convincing their parents not to force them into marriage, but instead allow them to finish school.

Sakena Yacoobi, Afghanistan.

Sakena Yacoobi, Afghanistan

Sakena Yacoobi founded the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) in 1995, during times of oppression and intense conflict.She opened 80 secret schools, trained teachers, and created secret mobile school libraries.

WORLD'S CHILDRENS PRIZE FOUNDATION

Långgatan 13, 647 30, Mariefred, Sweden
Phone: +46-159-129 00 • info@worldschildrensprize.org

© 2020 World’s Children’s Prize Foundation. All rights reserved. WORLD'S CHILDREN'S PRIZE®, the Foundation's logo, WORLD'S CHILDREN'S PRIZE FOR THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD®, WORLD'S CHILDREN'S PARLIAMENT®, WORLD'S CHILDREN'S OMBUDSMAN®, WORLD'S CHILDREN'S PRESS CONFERENCE® and YOU ME EQUAL RIGHTS are service marks of the Foundation.


 
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