Hand parting blinds
Windows with views

Stories about vulnerable children and Child Rights Heroes reflect many violations of children’s rights, but also proven solutions. Work individually at first, then take a combined approach and choose the best solution together as a group.

Purpose

To strengthen the ability to consider, analyse and galvanise people into action on complex issues.

Preparations

A3 sheet of paper and pencils for each group, or equivalent digital tool.

Do it like this

  1. Work in groups of four. Each group receives a large sheet of paper on which they draw a window with five panes (see picture). Everyone must have space to write on the paper.
  2. Hand out individual questions to the groups, and a text to read/film clip to watch about a Child Rights Hero or a child facing a problem or challenge. Pick a suitable story in The Globe, that sparks questions. It can be, for example:

    - A child is being forced to do dangerous work, often under slave-like conditions.
    Discuss: Who are the children who are being enslaved, and abused? What can be done to stop modern-day slavery?

    - A child is homeless, being forced to do whatever it takes to survive.
    Discuss: How did this child end up on the street? Perhaps she had to run away from abuse? Or did she lose her family through violence or a natural disaster? What can be done to make sure that children are not forced to live on the street in the future?

  3. Allow time for everyone to read and reflect on the text.
  4. After reading and reflecting, every­ one writes at least three suggested problem solutions in ‘their’ window pane.
  5. The participants each explain their suggestions to the others, and their reasoning behind it.

 
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