Two people hugging.
How Spès works for children

FVS Amade has set up Child Protection Groups in the suburbs and villages where they work, to ensure that orphaned children come to no harm and are not exploited.

A couple of adults in each location are trained in children’s rights and basic law. They often work with the solidarity groups in the same village or suburb. They raise the alarm when they find out that a child’s rights are being violated. FVS Amade has its own lawyers, who can help out. FVS Amade is helping the government and Unicef to set up Child Protection Groups in all villa-ges, towns and suburbs across the country.

Support from a princess

In Burundi, all children aged between 7 and 13 must go to school. School is free, but many are unable to afford a school uniform, books and other school things. Pupils have to pass a test to go on to study after sixth grade. If you don’t pass, you either have to quit school or pay to go to a private school. Few can afford to do that. Before 2005, you had to pay for ye-ars one to six as well. Several organizations, including FVS, managed to convince the go-vernment to introduce free schooling. FVS has built its own school in Spès’ home town of Bururi for 268 pupils at secondary and upper secondary level. Forty of the pupils have been given a scholarship by FVS to attend the school. Spès wants the school to offer gifted pupils who have previously been helped by FVS the chance to study further, even if they haven’t passed the entrance test for secondary school. FVS’ school has been built using mo-ney donated by Princess Caroline of Monaco, who is president of the organization AMADE Mondiale. In 2013, FVS merged with Amade Burundi. That’s why FVS is now called FVS Amade. Spès is on the board of AMADE Mondiale.

 
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