Girls talking in Nepal
The WCP Program step-by-step

Want to be a changemaker to make the world a better place? Just like the Child Rights Heroes and many of the children in The Globe. Then the World’s Children’s Prize program (WCP) can support you.

Be a changemaker!

Take the opportunity to become a changemaker and stand up for the equal worth and rights of all people! You can make your voice heard and influence life where you live, in your country and around the world, now and in the future. Together with millions of other children, you can be involved in building a more compassionate world in which everyone is treated equally, where the Rights of the Child are respected and where people and the planet thrive.

The World’s Children’s Prize is launched

The WCP program kicks off when this year’s candidates, Child Rights Heroes who have made unique contributions to helping vulnerable children, are revealed. You can decide for yourself when to begin studying this year’s program. Many schools launch it by organising an opening ceremony.

Girls in workshop

STEP 1: THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD IN YOUR COUNTRY

Study the rights of the child and whether these rights are respected where you live. Is there anything you’d like to change? What responsibilities are attached to the rights?

STEP 2: YOU ME EQUAL RIGHTS

Be inspired by girls and boys who are fighting for equal rights for girls. Learn about the issues and how you can create change in your local communities and in your country.

Reading magazine nepal

STEP 3: THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD IN THE WORLD

Study facts and statistics about the situation for children in different countries. Experience other children's reality through stories about children living in diff erent places and under different circumstances. Also learn about the Child Jury

STEP 4: GLOBAL GOALS FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Learn about the Global Goals, which must be reached by 2030 in order to end extreme poverty, injustice and climate change. Part of this step is the Peace & Changemaker Generation in Southern Africa.

STEP 5: CHILD RIGHTS HEROES & CHANGEMAKERS

Meet the child advocates who are nominated to become the World’s Children’s Prize Decade Child Rights Hero. The candidates fight for a better world is inspiring and engaging for children and adults alike.

Voting

STEP 6: DEMOCRACY & ELECTION CAMPAIGN

Study the history of democracy and democratic principles. Find out how to run an election campaign and compare democratic development in your own community and country, with other parts of the world.

STEP 7: THE GLOBAL VOTE

Schools organize their own election day with ballot boxes, election officials and observers, and vote for their favourite from among the Child Rights Heroes. The election result for each candidate is reported to the WCP by 16 April.

Boy giving interview

STEP 8: ROUND THE GLOBE RUN FOR A BETTER WORLD

The Round the Globe Run for a Better World is held on 1 April. Children in your community and around the world present their demands for change, form a human chain and walk or run 3 km.

Girls performing at WCP ceremony

Celebrate!
The WCP Ceremony is led by the Child Jury at Gripsholm Castle in Mariefred, Sweden. All Child Rights Heroes are honoured and receive prize money towards their work with children. H.M. Queen Silvia of Sweden helps the children of the jury to present the awards. Many schools organise their own closing ceremony, where they show the video from the Ceremony and celebrate the rights of the child.

STEP 9: NO LITTER DAY

Children show that they belong to the No Litter Generation by cleaning up their communities, and by sharing knowledge about the environment and the need to fight climate change.

Age limit for the World’s Children’s Prize
The World’s Children’s Prize exists for anyone from age ten until the year they turn 18. The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child says that you are a child until you turn 18. The lower age limit is there for several reasons: in order to be able to participate in the Global Vote, you must learn all about the work of the nominees. The children they fight for have often experienced severe violations of their rights, and their stories can be frightening for younger children. Even older children may find it hard to read about such difficult experiences. That’s why it is important to have an adult to talk to afterwards.

 
x
x
x